How Solomon’s Seal Works to Heal You

The medicinal use of the root of the herb Solomon’s Seal (polygonatum biflorum or multiflorum) dates back over 3,500 years ago to the era of King Solomon. He was so impressed by the plant’s diverse healing qualities that he proclaimed it a gift from God, and thus named it after himself. Its more “modern day” acknowledgement was by Dioscorides and Pliny in the 1st Century, A.D. Asian medicine considers it one of the ten top healing plants. Ancient Europeans and North American Indians considered it a medicinal “workhorse” of wide value. Today, there is increasing interest in the therapeutic values of the plant.

Solomon's Seal (polygonatum biflorum)

Just a partial list of its uses demonstrates Solomon’s Seal’s wide healing potential:

  • Rebuilds damaged cartilage & connecting tissue
  • Reduces inflammation and speeds healing of bruises, wounds and skin irritations
  • Hastens recovery from bone injuries (broken, stressed, osteoarthritis) and associated connective tissues, including arthritis
  • Produces synovial fluid to reduce grinding in joints
  • Tightens or loosens (as needed) tendons, ligaments, joints & attachments associated with repetitive stress, injury & inflammation
  • Soothes gastrointestinal inflammation and injuries
  • Loosens mucous in lungs
  • Regulates blood pressure
  • Treats and relieves women’s issues

The question remains, however, what makes Solomon’s Seal work so well? What are its constituents that, when processed into a tincture, salve, tea or liniment, or when combined with those of another herb, empower its healing qualities? Continue reading

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Solomon’s Seal Tea: Healing Benefits

The wildcrafted root of the herb Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum biflorum or multiflorum) is widely known and used in tincture form (internally) or as a salve (externally). However, when prepared as a tea (i.e. herbal infusion) Solomon’s Seal root has unique healing benefits, as compared to tincture or salve.

The information available on the Internet about using Solomon’s Seal as a tea is not entirely accurate, especially suggested dosage amounts. The purpose of this article is to clarify the potential healing benefits of Solomon’s Seal tea for certain health issues, including its proper preparation and dosage.

Tincture or Tea?

First, it is important to clarify when the tea can offer superior healing and when it is more advantageous to use Solomon’s Seal as a tincture or salve. In some cases, the tincture and tea are interchangeable. If for some reason you cannot consume alcohol-based tinctures, than by all means try the tea. It has a mild, slightly sweet, nutty taste and is cooling and moistening to the body.

Solomon’s Seal tea, in particular, makes the best use of the plant’s excellent demulcent qualities (also referred to as mucilaginous or muco-protective). Mucilage is a polysaccharide substance obtained from the roots or seeds of a plant. A mucilaginous or demulcent herb is viscous and gelatinous, and thus protective and soothing to the mucus membranes and other irritated or inflamed internal tissues of the body. Continue reading