Does Worry Make You Sick?

What robs us of our peace of mind? What steals away our joy? What diminishes our hope, will and faith? What jeopardizes our health? In short, what everyday habit limits our life?

WORRY.

We cannot seem to escape it. We worry about job and financial security. We worry about our health, and the high costs to treat disease and illness. We worry about a natural catastrophe that can wipe our homes and possessions away within minutes. We worry about getting older. We worry about crime and our safety. We worry about basic survival, maintaining a sense of dignity, and somehow getting our fair share. We even worry that our voice will not be heard, that no one is listening.

At its most basic, worry is simply a thought. Dr. Zacharty Bercovitz states, “Some patients I see are actually draining into their bodies the diseased thoughts of their minds.” In other words, worry can be characterized as a cycle of inefficient thought revolving about a pivot of fear. Such fear can keep us restless and filled with tension. “Worry, doubt, fear and despair,” said General Douglas MacArthur, “are the enemies that slowly bring us down to the ground and turn us to dust before we die.” Continue reading

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Solomon’s Seal and the Healing Effects of Prayer and Affirmation

Solomon’s Seal has a long history as a plant with diverse healing capabilities. However, it is fallacious to assume that it can be the end-all to your discomfort from injury. I encourage you to be open to and informed about various healing modalities: from the traditional to the alternative, from science to spiritual. For example, in moments of trauma, injury or crisis people have a natural inclination toward help in the form of prayer, visualization or affirmation.

Many years ago I counseled Viet Nam war veterans who returned home with mangled bodies from stepping on land mines. I would walk through the softly lit ward and hear streams of prayers filter through fits of crying. As a young intern, I became aware that, beyond any medical intervention I had idealized to be their cure, there was a deeper level of intervention they sought for which I had little understanding. Consequently, I decided that in any form of counseling and rehabilitation therapy I offered, I would strive to embolden the individual not only through science but also through their faith. After all, I reasoned, an injury may be more than just a broken body part; it may also be a broken spirit. Continue reading